Here’s Why You Should Add Tempeh to Your Diet (Plus 15 Recipes to Try)

Nutrients in tempeh are quite balance and can replace some nutrients from animals, make it suitable for those who become vegan. To boost nutrition and slim things down a bit, I have a little trick of cooking nutrient-rich and fiber-rich recipe with tempeh.

Originating from the Indonesian island of Java, tempeh is a nutty, savory fermented soybean cake. It’s made by a natural culturing and controlled fermentation process that binds soybeans into a very firm cake. Tempeh has a bold, nutty distinct flavor and it’s one of those foods that people seem to love or hate with equal ferociousness, with little room for indecision. What makes it so bold? Fermentation via Rhizopus oligosporus—a mold.

(C) The Kitchn

Fermentation of tempeh begins with whole soybeans. The beans are rinsed, drained and then inoculated with a starter culture that contains Rhizopus mold spores. The tempeh is then fermented at temperatures of 85-90 degrees Fahrenheit/29-32 Celsius for several days. As the mycelium (bacteria colony) grows, it binds the soybeans into a dense, white cake. Sometimes there will be grey or black spots also present on the tempeh; this is completely normal. Avoid tempeh with pink, yellow or blue spots as this indicates that it has been overly fermented.

Tempeh is an incredibly versatile, highly nutritious and delightfully delicious addition to any diet. Let’s take a closer look at why you should add tempeh to your diet, plus some recipes to get you inspired.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/heres-why-you-should-add-tempeh-to-your-diet-plus-15-recipes-to-try.html